"America, you know I'm crazy!"

Posted by david | 3:07 PM | 0 comments »

NCV Dad's Bible

Posted by david | 1:08 PM | | 0 comments »

I'm not a big fan of the "let's add a little content to a Bible and see how many we can sell". I reluctantly ordered the NCV Dad's Bible thinking I could pass it along a gift some time. THe book over came my cynicism.

First, the New Century Version translation offers simplicity without sacrificing accuracy. For first-time reader of the Word the NCV is an ideal Bible. The NCV manages to maintain the integrity of the biblical text without complex theological vocabulary.

Next, the Dad's Bible itself has great supplmentary content. Sections include:
Walking in authority. Godly Character, Passing it on, Dad's in the Bible, Building your children, Insights, question and answer resource and topical index. This is a great gift for a new dad or encouragemnet for a father wanting to more invovled in reading the Word. Each a helpful and easy to read sections. I'm impressed with the calibre of the NCV Dad' Bible.

The Right to Lead, John Maxwell

Posted by david | 1:16 PM | 0 comments »

John Maxwell's, "The Right to Lead" is a small but powerful book. The book is ideal if you need a reminder of the core values and keys to leadership or want to make a gift to someone to encourage and grow them.

With deficits in leadership in our churches, homes and corporate world, we need to focus on developing true leadership learned through character and courage. It is unlike me to post full excerpts from a book, however below you will fin the preface from "The Right to Lead". I how you feel its impact as I did.

WHAT GIVES A MAN OR WOMAN THE RIGHT TO LEAD?

It certainly isn't gained by election or appointment. Having position, title, rank, or degrees doesn't qualify anyone to lead other people. And the ability doesn't come automatically from age or experience, either. No, it would be accurate to say that no one can be given the right to lead. The right to lead can only be earned. And that takes time.

The Kind of Leader Others Want to Follow

The key to becoming an effective leader is not to focus on making other people follow, but on making yourself the kind of person they want to follow. You must become someone others can trust to take them where they want to go. As you prepare yourself to become a better leader, use the following guidelines to help you grow:

Let go of your ego.

The truly great leaders are not in leadership for personal gain. They lead in order to serve other people. Perhaps that is why Lawrence D. Bell remarked, "Show me a man who cannot bother to do little things, and I'll show you a man who cannot be trusted to do big things."

Become a good follower first.

Rare is the effective leader who didn't learn to become a good follower first. That is why a leadership institution such as the United States Military Academy teaches its officers to become effective followers first - and why West Point has produced more leaders than the Harvard Business School.

Build positive relationships.

Leadership is influence, nothing more, nothing less. That means it is by nature relational. Today's generation of leaders seem particularly aware of this because title and position mean so little to them. They know intuitively that people go along with people they get along with.

Work with excellence.

No one respects and follows mediocrity. Leaders who earn the right to lead give their all to what they do. They bring into play not only their skills and talents, but also great passion and hard work. They perform on the highest level of which they are capable.

Rely on discipline, not emotion.

Leadership is often easy during the good times. It's when everything seems to be against you - when you're out of energy, and you don't want to lead - that you earn your place as a leader. During every season of life, leaders face crucial moments when they must choose between gearing up or giving up. To make it through those times, rely on the rock of discipline, not the shifting sand of emotion.

Make adding value your goal.

When you look at the leaders whose names are revered long after they have finished leading, you find that they were men and women who helped people to live better lives and reach their potential. That is the highest calling of leadership - and its highest value.

Give your power away.

One of the ironies of leadership is that you become a better leader by sharing whatever power you have, not by saving it all for yourself. You're meant to be a river, not a reservoir. If you use your power to empower others, your leadership will extend far beyond your grasp.

In The Right to Lead, you will hear from and read about people who have done these same things and earned the right to lead others. Because of the courage they found and the character they displayed, other people recognized their admirable qualities and felt compelled to follow them.

The followers who looked to these leaders learned from them, and so can we. As you explore their worlds and words, remember that it takes time to become worthy of followers. Leadership isn't learned or earned in a moment.


-John Maxwell

Puppets gone Wrong

Posted by david | 8:21 AM | 0 comments »

There are good puppets and there are bad puppets. This young man has obviously found some of the bad...

"I love this candy"

Posted by david | 3:44 PM | 0 comments »